Fast Food – Industrialized Eating?

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ISSUE BEING DISCUSSED FOR Monday, February 4th, 2013

Has fast food, as some claim, “industrialized” eating?

  • JRB

    The worst aspect about fast food is that it makes eating a purely utilitarian experience.  You need to eat like you need to fill up your car with gasoline. Man is made to think he is like a machine, without any spiritual or metaphysical value.

    • RaymondDrake

      And drive-throughs only exacerbate this filling station parallel…
      The order-taking waitress’s friendly smile and courtesy replaced by the faceless Intercom; music replaced by the noise of running engines and, if you are in or close to New York City, the touting horn rebuking the “slow” customer ahead; tablecloth, china and silverware replaced by a paper bag, wrappers, and a carton for the fries or onion rings; regular glass or crystal wine goblet changed for styrofoam or paper cup; table and chairs are replaced by the car’s front seat; flowers, wall-paper, paintings, valance drapes and sheers, everything that makes up a restaurant’s uplifting and civilizing ambiance is set aside in order to make room for the trucks, cars, and motorcycles sharing the road; and calm reflection or enjoyable conversation is substituted with the hustle and bustle of our industrialized culture that allows no time for the nobler things in life because “time is money.”

  • BenB

    Going much further than merely industrializing eating, fast food has also trivialized the concept of sharing meals, the fare too often consumed in isolation and while seeing to other tasks. Thankfully, there is an increasingly healthy reaction against fast food, not merely due to nutritional concerns. The metaphysical joys which arise from sharing a well-prepared meal lead to the formation of bonds which strengthen man’s spirit and enhance his life considerably. Even a necessary activity like eating is transformed into an art when coupled with the pursuit of excellence in cuisine and conversation.

  • Fjslo

    Going out used to be much more than food.  It was the ambience, the owners, staff and genuine courtesy that once existed.  In many towns and cities almost all of the restaurants are production factories.  They do their best to get you in and out as fast as possible with almost everything being artificial.  The staff are artificial, the food is artificial.  Olive Garden used to make fresh pasta right in the waiting area, today it comes from who knows where with a quick pop into the microwave before serving.  Family restaurants are organic therefore not as mathematically efficient as food factories so they have difficulty competing.  For family owners their restaurant is their life, not a career. 

  • I miss real home made food, made from fresh ingredients.  The best ingredient of all was the love and care of the cook, who took legitmate pride in making food and in seeing his customers enjoy it.

    All the human elements has been crushed out of the eating experience today, as small town diners close and big chain restaurants open. 

    As in every other field of human activity, eating has become a machine like experience, as if the the human being were a cog in the wheel of a giant and inexorable machine to produce.

    I also miss the conviviality that naturally develops from quality food and atmosphere.  Soon, people may be able to live by popping food pills, or by pulling up to a human filling station, like a human herd, to imbibe some substance from a hose and drive off.

     

    • cyberman304

       I heard, on Catholic radio sometime back, that one way to solve societal problems will be at the dinner table.

  • orchard

    The fast food phenomena is responsible for our industrialized way of eating today. From the early sixties until now it has transshipped many Americans to
    prefer eating on the road rather than a nice restaurant with a calm ambiance. The phrase “Dashboard Dinners” first surfaced in the early eighties. Who would ever believe it would reach the popularity it enjoys today.  A good amount of people today now eat breakfast, lunch and dinner in their cars. I’m waiting for one of the car companies to introduce a new model that has a microwave oven as an option.
    It is almost as if the whole concept of this way of eating  was developed in a lab. Every detail was planned and designed to encourage people to dine while they are driving. From the drive through window, the packaging and the super quick robot style service. Even the easy way to unpack and eat what you ordered, all within 3.5 seconds while your cruising at sixty miles and hour towards your destination.
    Talk about a frenzied way of eating and living; now we know why ant-acid products are so popular today. Probably down the road these companies will start to add Mylanta to their sodas so people won’t have to loose time picking up something for their indigestion. Wow what a time saver that would be!
    All of these changes in lifestyle add to the “intemperance” we are experiencing in our society today.

  • Kevin Edwards

    Any metaphysically value of food is practically stripped from eating when it comes to fast food.  It has also brought horse meat and unknown mystery substances to the masses.