Local Production Also Involves Relationships


MarketplaceWhen talking about local productions, many people only think in terms of place. Many think “local” only refers to where production happens. However, “local” also involves relationships—in this case, local relationships. Over time people develope relationships with nearby producers so that these products became part of the local culture.


All this changed with mass production.

As Douglas Rushkoff states:

While mass production desocialized the worker, mass marketing desocialized consumption. Brands had to alienate people from one another in order to replace the human bonds that once characterized commerce with artificial corporate ones. National brand relationships replaced local social relationships. Instead of supplying a neighbor with a particular good, the best one could hope for in an industrial economy was finding a friend loyal to the same brand” (Douglas Rushkoff, Life Inc.: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take it Back, Random House, New York, 2009, p. 99).