When We Act Like Machines

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“From the time we wake up to the time before we go to sleep, we are rushing.”

“When we function like our machines and computers we adopt habits outside our rhythms of our nature.” –Return to Order, John Horvat II

Daily Life in a Frenzied World

From the time we wake up and grab coffee from our automated coffee machine to the time we plug in our phone for a good nights charge before we go to sleep, we are rushing.

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Our lives are dictated by a schedule monster in our heads that keep us from slowing down. We have to get one task done so that we can move on to the next task at a breakneck pace. We have to finish our lunch quickly so that we can grab those extra few minutes after lunch so that we can text a little longer so that we can tie down that deal to get another car to drive faster to work so that we can get work done faster to get more time to buy more time-saving gadgets so that we can find more time to get other gadgets so that we can do…what????

It’s a mad dash for nothing. We have all these little objectives and priorities that when finished, just lead to nothing but more mad dashes. It’s a vicious circle. But, even when we do get to that free time, we have the sensation that there is nothing to do! Never before in history has there been so many people who say almost in the same breath “I don’t have time” and then “I don’t have anything to do.” How did it all get to be this way!

We Mechanize Ourselves

We are trying to mechanize ourselves and it is not working. We think, “I will work like mad, not take any breaks except maybe to eat on the go, but certainly not to have a pleasant conversation with my co-worker or an employee. I will do this because I want to reserve quality time for my family and get them more money so that eventually I won’t have to work anymore.”

This sounds a somewhat upright thought process, if we were machines. But, we’re not. Many of us need familiar human interaction, good food in a long leisurely lunch hour and in general, a balanced, calm day. When we don’t act humans for the first part of the day, we will never act like a human when we are around our family. We come home exhausted and grouchy.


The only thing we want to do is be alone with our entertainment. We hardwire ourselves not to have any entertainment until we get home, but we can’t handle that, so technology entertainment starts to work its way into our work time. Then, we aren’t working at all and everything falls apart.

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We are far from condemning technology; it is the abuse that is nauseating. We could harness the technology to do brilliant things. Instead, we are making our own little cyber-world of entertainment which causes relationships and lives to fall apart. We have mechanized ourselves to only find joy in that little cyber-world- a wretched, horrific fate for any man. So, the conclusion is: technology does not run your life, your relationships, your work; you run your life and use technology for the accomplishment of great things.

  • Dorothy

    I certainly agree with the above article. People should be in charge of their own lives, not be slaves of a mad, rushing society or of technology. Technology, like the automobile, is a great tool if it is used for the purpose for which it was intended. I use a computer and the Internet, but I am not a slave to either. People need to slow down and nourish their spirits. God, rather than the mad rush of the world, needs to once again be the main focus of our lives.