Unfriending Facebook

Close up of friends using smart phones.Facebook is a poster child of our postmodern economy. It is one of those “fun” companies that breaks all the rules, smashes traditional hierarchies and lets its employees exercise their creativity without all the restrictions of times past. And it seems to work fabulously.

With interns reportedly earning as much $74,000 a year and many other positions taking home six figure salaries, Facebook can take the pick of the best of the best graduates out of the nation’s top colleges. Employees enjoy plenty of perks, prestige and stock options. Everyone literally gets a free lunch at the company’s gourmet cafeterias. It is no wonder that Facebook is voted among the world’s best places to work with plenty of people clicking on the “would like [to work]” button.


RTO mini2Free Book: Return to Order: From a Frenzied Economy to an Organic Christian Society—Where We’ve Been, How We Got Here, and Where We Need to Go


It would seem that the success of Facebook invalidates the claims of those who criticize the firm as an example of what I call the “frenetic intemperance” of modern economy. Facebook’s celebrated freewheeling style, dramatic growth and $100 billion bottom line say frenetic intemperance pays off just fine.

But, like the personal Facebook pages it hosts, appearances can be deceiving. Behind the optimistic images posted all over the media, there is a disturbing reality that is not often seen. Not everyone is happy about working in the firm’s supposedly idyllic climate.

On the question-and-answer website Quora, former employees expressed discontent with Facebook. The frank discussion especially focused on the frantic pace of work and the exhausting psychological consequences of working under pressure. An article in the Daily Telegraph reporting on the discussion also drew hundreds of comments echoing an astonishing disenchantment with Facebook.

What do these former employees complain about? Curiously, precisely those “fun” things that are heralded as cutting edge in the new postmodern workplace: the lack of organization, focus and rules.

Working for Facebook can be exhausting since this is not your normal 9-to-5 job that plays by the old rules. Everything goes. Employees can be subjected to long 12-14 hour workdays under stressful conditions. Engineers complained of being on call 24/7 for weeks at a time to keep service up and running. Employees are absorbed by the fast pace and intensity of their work.

The no-walls free-flow atmosphere that is supposed to foster creativity is also stressful to workers who complain of a complete lack of privacy whatsoever at the social media giant.

At most companies, you put up a wall between a work personality and a personal one, which ends up with a professional workspace,” wrote one former employee. “This wall does not exist at Facebook which can lead to some uncomfortable situations.”

Yet another popular complaint was the laid-back attitude that left everything undefined and unfocused. Employees sensed a lack of infrastructure to provide guidance or support. There are constant guessing games where workers are expected to intuit what is happening in their departments and what is expected of them. The result is a “lack of professionalism” and “stability” where instructions are not clear and organization is lacking, which leads, in turn to stressful situations.

Subscription1.1These and other complaints underscore the importance of human relationships and leadership in the workplace. It is not surprising that, despite high wages, perks and the prestige of being part of an over-hyped company, there are those who opt out of working in a pressure cooker. People are not made to live in an atmosphere where a reckless spirit of unrestraint and instant gratification dominates. They need guidance, infrastructure and leadership to give them support. As a result, frenetic intemperance takes its toll upon the psyche causing burnout and disillusionment.

Facebook needs to face the fact that life is not a Facebook page consisting of superficial posts of fun and games. Until the social media giant learns this important lesson, it can expect to see itself increasingly “unliked” and “unfriended” by its disillusioned employees.


  • dennis best

    Not to mention that Facebook’s success is derived from a population trained to believe that everything revolves around self, and are therefore so desperately seeking a community acceptance that every important aspect of their lives needs to be plastered for public attention. If we could return to family and community focus, instead of self, not only would the importance of a Facebook account dwindle, but a new closeness to family and real friends would develop, greater social fullfillment would be felt, improved neighbor relations, and ultimately a strengthening of community and community spirit which will be vital in the coming days as our economy grows closer to the brink.

    • Joe Right

      Good point. Where did I hear “vanity of vanities” before?

      • GoyGeorge

        I have no desire to be part of a community, contribute to other human beings, or be under their farcical auspices of “authority” & I use facebook to lash out at & provoke others around me in the hopes of starting a movement that will entirely reject the man-made concept of “law” and “authority”; as both of these concepts are fallacious and dependent literally on a variation of the time-tested claim of “because I said so”.

        • whawell

          So far you are doing a good job encouraging others to defy authority. Keep it up at every person’s peril. You might even consider joining “Black Lives Matter” or some other subversive group. Liberty and freedom, which can’t exist without authority, are just for nut cases.

          • GoyGeorge

            Do you enjoy being an obedient coward?

          • Tom

            Nothing like a little old ad hominem instead of a rational reply. Typical of people who can’t think clearly and do not understand consequences of their ideas. How do I know? I taught college logic for 45 years.

          • whawell

            Obedience does not spell cowardice. The fact is, obedience is necessary for social order. But why do call me a “coward”?

          • GoyGeorge

            Obedience is cowardice.

            People complain about “hating the way things are” and then just sit back and do nothing. Some of them still believe that their “vote” (hahaha) matters to anyone, so they make statements like “we need to get out to the polls for x”.

            No, what you need to do if you dont like how things are is take drastic action.

          • whawell

            Well, I do take action when I see something is wrong. This does not mean
            I have to be disobedient? Absolutely not! Occasionally I recite the Serenity Prayer: “God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference”. Does this approach make me a coward? In response to your suggestion that I should not bother to vote, if no one bothered to vote for candidate “x” or any other candidate, how could our collective voice be heard? Just because the world is far from perfect does not mean we should not in any way – even a small one – bother to vote.

          • whawell

            I don’t know what you mean by “drastic action”. If by that you mean setting the world on fire, then I must disagree. Setting the world on fire is the sort of behavior we witnessed from radical terrorist groups like ISIS. It’s very counter-productive to the human condition and deplorable as well when you see such things as children being used in suicide attempts. Let me offer another motto I try to live by: “It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness”. This motto when applied to daily living works well in raising children. A nagging parent can literally drive children crazy while an abundance of due praise does wonders in a child’s life.

          • gaetan

            And total rebellion and lawlessness in complete insecurity and emptyness of soul.

          • Kiara

            Are you a troll?
            I, too am disenchanted with FB and hardly go on it anymore.
            Any good suggestions for another GOOD social media?

          • whawell

            No, I’m not against FB. I was just responding to prior poster who takes an anti-social view of the world. I do believe however that FB disseminates personal information that might be detrimental to ones own interests. Users should beware of using FB.

          • Faustina11

            Neighbors and church

        • Sanctus 3

          I see that part of your iconoclastic urge targets English grammar as well as the other purported “man-made” concepts.

          • GoyGeorge

            Do you have any actual rebuttal to my statement?

          • Lawless behavior causes many problems, especially when one steps on his neighbors rights, not allowing free speech (opposing views), and we saw the climax of lawlessness in the Chinese cultural revolution 1966-1976, and its literal cannibalism, and also in today’s mafia states (eg. Russia). No thanks. Say someone disregards the dog leash rule, then big dogs eat little dogs, not pretty. This is not to say that some laws are immoral, and should not be obeyed. But in general lawless behavior is bad.

          • Janet Butler

            When someone robs you at gunpoint, steals your car, appropriates your identity, drains your bank accounts, rapes your wife and children, and burns down your house, let us know how the rejection of “man-made” laws works. And no, don’t plead “human decency” and “common sense” as coming to the rescue in your reply. Those will not exist in a lawless, individually-piloted society. There is no decency without an external standard, nor is there “common sense” without a foundation of decency. Therefore, nothing restrains those people who do the things mentioned above…except their own desires. And nothing will, once a law-based society is rejected. If their desires are to see you dead, good luck. We’ll be waiting with bated breath to see how you handle this.

          • GoyGeorge

            I’m not worried about it. I own weapons. After the time I was put in the hospital over refusing to give a junky a deposit from my former job, I swore that I would never be a victim again– I haven’t been to this day.

            I’m working on moving to the middle of a secluded area to avoid the human race as much as feasibly possible, but my distaste for so-called “authorities” stems from off-grid living being illegal.

          • gaetan

            Don’t flatter yourself little GG! Your attempt at emmulating satan’s disdain for man is wasted on him.

          • GoyGeorge

            Satan? You’re kidding me, right?

            Do you still write letters to Santa Claus as well?

          • Conservative voter

            You seem to be angry. Maybe reading God’s word, the BIble. might bring you some comfort. Start with the Book of John and realize how much God loves you. Seclusion is not the answer, fellowship in the body of Christ would be helpful. May God bless you.

          • GoyGeorge

            There is no god. There is no point in reading the bible.

          • Conservative voter

            Very well made points. Chaos reigns without boundaries.

          • gaetan

            Agitation is your only source of content? Pathetic!

        • gaetan

          I see you like to feed off of your own vomit and scat there little GG!

      • Edwin

        I HATE FACEBOOK! I only use FB to give bad words to the muslim pests and
        the Banks and expose the New world order nonsense . I can live without

  • Albert Maslar

    As an 84-year old non-Geek, I am happy to say I do not participate in Facebook, Twitter, and the like. Social Media seems too distracting from the real issues of life. Besides, all they want to do is sell something, and I can do that on my own.

    • 441019

      Facebook and Twitter can be used for good, as well as for bad or for wasting time. I use Twitter to try to spread information people should know about important issues–to try to counteract propaganda.

      • salesgirl

        But Twitter can be worse than FB – there’s no way to limit who sees your posts and you get people harassing you

    • Margaret lee Combs

      I find it useful in saving dogs in shelters as it’s good for networking.

  • Walter George Schulte

    It is good to hear that Facebook is not beneficial as it would seem. I have questioned the value of Facebook and wondered what sense of community does it help to build? Does it really help people to care more about others?

  • Nacho Guatemalteco

    que importante ver la vida como es y no en una “realidad virtual” donde nada es cierto ni agradable dentro, aunque afuero si lo parezca.

    • Jumbam B. Joseph

      One of the best articles I have read in the last 12 months.

  • Alan Aversa

    Facebook can be used as a tool.

    • schm0e

      the fifth branch of government.

      google is the fourth.

  • Echoing all the other comments…perhaps we (I’m generalizing society’s use of Facebook) are partially to blame here. We DEMAND that FB be running all the time. With that kind of demand and the fact that many businesses rely on the service must put considerable pressure on the company and its people. If it goes down for any length of time, the company will suffer in the fast-paced world.

  • schm0e

    short this pig.

    if I wasn’t a poor, broke, laid-off relic of a programmer who’s been unemployed 3 1/2 years since November, 2008, I’d short it myself.

  • schm0e

    Everybody go get a copy of “Understanding Media” by Marshall McLuhan. You will understand the world you find yourself in now much better having read and understood even a page of it.

  • Brother Matthew Levis

    I am glad to see this article. I was complaining of the very lack of privacy the first time I tried to use face book. then I tried to unsubscribe and I found that it is not people friendly in this regards. I still am unable to unsubscribe.

    • You can completely delete your Facebook account.https://www.facebook.com/help/delete_account?rdrhc

      • DMG

        Hi Myke Rosenthal-English,
        I have been trying to delete myself from facebook many more times than I would like to remember. They stop you at every turn. I thought I was deleted at least a year ago, after working on it for over an hour. I was so frustrated I wanted to scream! I was only on there for a couple of weeks, and during that time I was emailed on my private email three (3) times by some strange men wanting to “get together” for lunch! I couldn’t believe it! How did they get my email address? I also had someone who I once worked with who back-stabbed me on more than one occasion try to befriend me!? Yeh, right, just the kind of person I would want to befriend. The whole face book concept creeps me out, and I don’t want anything to do with it. Imagine my surprise when I was contacted by facebook saying there were about six (6) people, complete with their little pictures, who wanted to befriend me!!? I thought I had been deleted by this scuzzy outfit, but lo and behold there they were right before my very eyes! Could you please post your comments again, since “somehow” part of your way to completely delete your facebook account was missing – part of an email address at the end/incomplete. I hope you receive this. Thanks in advance, Dodie

        • Log in to your facebook account and use this link,then press DELETE ACCOUNT https://www.facebook.com/help/delete_account

          • msueh

            (I know this is an old article, but I just found today, so am commenting on your post now, at Thanksgiving time 2015!):

            Well, son-of-a-GUN!!!!! I’m really ticked off. I was on for a very short time, YEARS ago, cuz my older sis wanted to share pics of her new grandkids, then deleted (I thought) account when I realized the total lack of privacy. Clicking on your link shows me they disrespected my DELETE request. I’m really pissed. Thanks for the directions; I’ll see if they pay attention this time. I have NO use for fb. At all.

      • Edwin

        Thanks, I just deleted my FB account .. Let the Islamic pests use it

    • Mary

      Well, then, I guess I got lucky. They blocked, and have blocked, me right from the beginning for what I don’t know. Ahhh! The Lord works in mysterious ways.

      • salesgirl

        Just praise Jesus, instead of blaspheme Him, and you’re in Facebook’s cross hairs!!!

  • Zeljko

    It seems to me like an institute in a book of CS Lewis “That hideous strength”. The main motto of this institute is “elasticity” meaning there are no clear rules. It seems really prophetic book, he also prophesied how such institute would use the media.

  • Helen Spingola

    Facebook, Twitter,etc. bring the words “boring”….”ego driven” to my mind. Total
    waste of time.

    • Ole Aggie

      Did about two weeks of FB to arrive at your conclusion. I was slow to recognize it by about a week and a half.

  • windjammer

    Great article. Absolutely true. However, as a means of communicating it can no more be dismissed or ignored than Google, Amazon or the internet in general. The question is “How to use it properly to evangelize the OTF?” We are all called to be little “St Paul’s” in our own families and circles of influence. FB is one tool in a toolbox. Nothing will every take the place of one on one human interaction but St Paul would no more ignore the internet and FB than he would have tried to swim the Med rather than taking a boat.

    • salesgirl

      Right, and for many it is not a suitable tool. Wastes too much time when there are real human beings in need of friendship and help right on their block or in their home. Then there’s all the “tools” who populate Facebook that you have to spend an inordinate amount of time blocking etc. People tend to take their bad days out on everything and everyone on FB….and almost every day is a bad day for them.

  • Parque_Hundido

    The entire premise of this story is a thread on Quora that he doesn’t even bother to quote? How does this guy expect to be taken seriously when he writes nonsense like this?

  • jrj90620

    I’m forced to use Facebook to “like” some company,to get some reward.Otherwise have no idea what people do there.

  • Ed Graveline

    On Facebook, I found St. Paul Street Evangelization which started me evangelizing on the Las Vegas Strip for 18 months now. We have given out 7,000 Rosaries with pamphlets on how to pray it, over 2000 Miraculous Medals and at least 7000 pamphlets explaining our Catholic faith. Over 750 have told us they will come back to the Church and about 85 had asked how they can become Catholic. Facebook is a tool. It can be used for good or bad. I get to evangelize on it a lot too.

    • Nila Kucharski

      Love what you are doing; would like to find out more of the St. Paul Street Evangelizaion. Do you go in a group?
      Nila M. Kucharski

  • Jenn

    from what I have hear it is nothing but a hornets nest of information to teens about S and M and other sexual rubbish…

    • salesgirl

      It can be if you don’t set your profile to private and friend people you don’t know offline

  • George Alexa

    I just listened to the video on the Return to Order – very powerful. Looks like my next step is to first read the free chapter and then get the book. There is hope for our Country!

  • Carolyn Ritchie Victory

    I’m sure I’l not make any friends by saying this but this sounds exactly like my large Catholic family growing up except there was also no money to be had either. I don’t know how people can adhere to Catholic principles in an atmosphere of chaos, not following Catholic principles really, just driven by not practicing birth control but also not practicing temperance or marital chastity. Why is this not discussed in Catholic circles?

  • prolifemama

    6 of our five kids (youngest daughter’s in Heaven) tell me “Mom, don’t do FB — have a life!!!”

    Truthfully, I haven’t really been tempted to sign up. Our kids themselves rarely use it. I’m not sure if some of them have tried to unsubscribe. Evangelizing through it sounds good, though. But I’m already doing that on some pro-abort websites. Pray for these sisters and brothers!

  • PaxChristi2015

    Just over a month ago, I deleted my Facebook after three-and-a-half years of being a more-than-active user, and I have to say: It was probably the third-best decision I’ve ever made in my life (second-best was going to DeSales University, first-best was becoming a Catholic). As several people have said here, Facebook CAN be used for good if one remains properly disciplined with how they use it. But this was not the case for me. Though I did my best to preach a little gospel whenever I could, I was inevitably sucked into the chaos of friending/unfriending and being friended/unfriended at the touch of a button, constantly seeking attention with (rather forced) witticisms and corny pictures, and feeling empty and depressed whenever I didn’t immediately get a “like” or a positive response to my posts/comments.

    Thankfully, when I proclaimed my decision to jump ship, I finally found out who among my acquaintances (whose numbers ranged at various times between 40 and 120 or so) truly enjoyed my company and truly wished to keep hearing what I had to say. I suppose I could have just tried to learn a bit of discipline, but being a very black-and-white, all-or-nothing kind of guy, I felt distinctly that remaining in any sort of proximity to such an emotional/psychological can of worms would not be a good idea.

    • MakeDonaldDrumpfAgain

      Dear Guest,

      I’m contemplating deleting my personal FB page (I have two business pages that I would like to keep open), and I would like to hear more about how you finally had the courage (fortitude) to arrive at your decision to “jump ship”, as you say. If you feel compelled to share anything with me, you can email me at jusher7281@tds.net. That’s my junk email address, so please make sure I know why you are writing to me. Thank you!


      • DeplorableMrRightWingDave

        It takes no courage. Just a couple of clicks of the mouse and “boom”. Done. Your real friends have your phone number. (And then I realized just how stale this comment section is…You posted 4 months ago! Oops.)

    • Bingolady

      St. Francis de Sales was a Jesuit…..a religious order requiring a demanding oath to contribute to Globalism!! Not the brand of Catholicism I can ascribe to as it is over reaching socialism. If people knew this, they would agree with me.

      • I think you haven’t really studied this please check your facts, you are in error.

        • Bingolady

          Check out the Jesuit Agenda. Do an internet search. Read their oath. It’s a form of Catholicism trying to take over the world. You will need to do a lot of reading.

    • Edwin

      I HATE FACEBOOK! I only use FB to give bad words to the muslim pests and
      the Banks and expose the New world order nonsense . I can live without

    • Edwin

      Good you became a Catholic . The Catholic Church is the true Church who gave the world the Bible . The Immaculate Heart Of Mary will triumph . All the rest atheists, false religions, false protestant churches , false prophets , etc will be destroyed. Only the Catholic Church will survive

  • MairinT

    As a 74 year old active Traditional Catholic, I find Facebook has become for me a positive link to like-minded Catholics and organizations all around the world. Considering how the Church is pilloried, mocked, betrayed with Church attendance fall off in many places, it just amazes me to see the growth with young people finding the great gift of the Faith and participating at all levels. Una Voce is certainly living up to its name. Besides, pro-Life and pro-Family movements link up, display their wonderful work through the FB ‘sharing’ system…work that main stream media usually ignores – If the inner workings of Facebook are so shameful, that is another issue. That is caused by the disease of ‘Greed’ which seems to affect many areas from governments down and is cruel. Difficult for those IT folk to move on when jobs are so scarce. As another elderly man said to me after he served Mass, if it were not for the internet we would know nothing about the Church and the shenanigans e.g. certain German Cardinals and manipulation of the recent launch of the Synod on the Family, the homosexual agenda within the Church, Cardinal Dolan’s support for homosexual promotion at the upcoming St. Patrick’s Day Parade (whoopy – he will be Parade Marshall – yuck!) while he breaks off with Priests for Life. So, Internet and Facebook are valuable – when used PROPERLY.

    • Leslie

      I agree with you

  • Paul John Perla

    Facebook, although I personally find the formatting options rather limiting, can be a good thing. It really depends on how it is used. Ed Graveline mentioned how he found a good evangelization site on Facebook. I started one also called MIRACLES of CATHOLICISM and there are many who are now following the page. It is a little family of faith who connect via the Facebook page where they can share and pray for one another.

  • Edward Kinkead

    I also share a lot of things on my Catholic faith on Facebook as well.

  • Edward Kinkead

    I think facebook can be in one way be like alcohol. Alcohol is good but only if you use self control and limit your drinks. Facebook can in that fashion can be similar to alcohol.

  • Leonard Churilla

    Amen to that, Dennis. I for one get frustrated trying to keep up with all of the doings and antics of friends, relatives and perfect strangers. It seems like a contest to see who is the busiest and most outgoing. Instead of living our lives we are busy showing everybody else what we are doing, trying to top them. Facebook, like the ubiquitous cell phone, has become a curse to our society…..

  • Fernanda

    From the user perspective, I definitely see good and bad in Facebook. Like others who have commented here, I have found very good, even life changing, material on Facebook. Interestingly enough, whenever I’ve found something I’ve “needed” on Facebook, I’ve found it within 10 minutes of logging in. This means the other 110 minutes spent on FB represents time that could have been better spent elsewhere.

    I do want to point out a dark side I’ve seen to the situation where people have used FB to connect with other “like minded traditional Catholics.” I’ve been part of those groups of “like minded traditional Catholics” and unfortunately, very often, they tend to be forums where people complain about everything wrong with their own parishes and dioceses and share all their reasons for disengaging from their parish life. “My priest is so liberal,” or “our masses are so irreverent,” “the music is so fluffy,” or “all my parish cares about is politically correct social justice,” followed by “I’m so thankful I’m part of this group of people who truly understand me!” All these negatives about the parishes may well be true. However, that doesn’t change the fact that for the lay Catholic, the normal center of Catholic life and faith is the Catholic parish. When the fervent Catholic refuses to engage his or her parish, I believe that situation is detrimental to all concerned. I would encourage all who are using FB to fellowship with other “like minded Catholics” to examine their motives for doing so and whether or not this is at the expense of really living in community with the people in their own geographical parishes. Of course, the fact that this goes on in FB is not necessarily FB’s fault. People who want to set themselves up as outside critics will always find a way to do so. But FB does provide yet another opportunity for people to do this and feel good about it, as well as for people to fall into this mentality without even realizing it.

    • salesgirl

      Agreed, Facebook is all about criticizing and little else. However, to be fair, have you ever had the misfortune of dealing with a parish like the ones they are complaining about? It’s hell on earth to witness such sacrilege and disrespect for Our Lord, and failure to teach the true faith. sad to say, however, these aging hippie priests refuse to listen to reason, and their bishops won’t lift a finger either, no matter how much charity or spoonfuls of sugar are employed to explain the grave harm they are doing. Thankfully it’s only a matter of time before the hippies retire, and they are replaced with the fine upstanding young men whom the seminaries are finally accepting and turning out. The only recourse left is to continue to volunteer with the local parish ministries, but attend a different parish for Mass

    • Mike

      Fernanda said “However, that doesn’t change the fact that for the lay Catholic, the normal center of Catholic life and faith is the Catholic parish. When the fervent Catholic refuses to engage his or her parish, I believe that situation is detrimental to all concerned.”

      I don’t use FB, but I did find myself on the internet with “like minded traditional Catholics.” As far as engaging those in our parish, my grandparents wagged their heads at the changes in the Church, my parents shrugged their shoulders, that was their engagement, and it was because they didn’t have access to the knowledge we have with the internet. To a certain extent, people choose chastisement rather then sanctification precisely because of their fellow parishioners. That is, social coercion was handed to the devil by the Church on a golden platter! We have 60% plus of Catholics rejecting one or more doctrines of the infallible magisterium, which renders parishes useless as a support structure for sanctification and for the proper raising of children. Pope Benedict implies I go to the TLM because of personal preference. So engaging parish members in why I really go to the TLM is next to impossible, because I have to prove I can reject his SP or MP for earlier positions taken by the magisterium like the dogma from Trent that a Rite handed down to us cannot be replace with another New Rite!

      Finding like minded traditional Catholics on the Internet is no replacement for a parish. But I don’t see parish life returning to us anytime soon!

      • Fernanda

        I’m sorry you feel that way, that you won’t be able to find decent parish life anytime soon. I won’t say the parish life I have is anywhere near ideal, and yes, I would love to have more support in raising my children to be holy. Some of the hardest things to hear, though, have come from very devout Catholics who seem to live this perfect domestic church life at home, and seem to think they’re better than everyone in the parish, and will flat out tell me that they have no use for parish catechism programs (I’m the DRE in my parish so that’s kind of harsh). I see that religious education programs are not everything they should be, and I’ve made a lot of gradual changes in my own program to improve it. However, it’s really tough to run or improve a good RE program when so many of the people who truly LIVE their faith and who truly KNOW Church teaching won’t lift a finger to help because they have no use for parish RE programs and can do it better themselves at home. Do you see the problem here? With that said, I totally understand where they come from because I’m a parent too. But I realize that as dysfunctional as my parish may be, the Church teaches me that it IS my family, so I have a responsibility to this group of people, however unholy they may seem to me and however far we may be from the ideal of what Church is. The way I see it, my parish needs me just as badly as I need my parish to be all it is meant to be. My parish needs me to get in there and do what I can to raise it up, just as I need it to be raised up.

        I should clarify that when I say things like “however dysfunctional my parish may be… etc.” I’m not implying or referring to any particular situations or individual people, just a general sense that compared to God’s plan for parish life, we fall short. We are a work in progress–a beautiful one at that. I have the amazing privilege to be part of God’s work in my parish.

        I think it’s great that you can connect with some likeminded Catholics on the Internet. You all can encourage and support each other. But then do please contribute to your parish, get involved, join a small group or ministry, and share what you know as well as learn from others. Maybe explaining why you like the Latin Mass or think it’s better than the New Order Mass isn’t the best place to start. But I’m sure if you got to know some people you’d soon find the common ground that you could build on.

  • They want to make Money

  • Jim Young

    Facebook is like the song hotel California, you can check in but you can never leave. The number one thing that I dislike of them is their afraid to post anything that might offend those raghead. But I do it anyway,we still live in America,we still have freedom of speech. I proudly served in the United States Marine Corps. I am proud of Country. But it really really burns me up to see what’s going these days. I keep Praying that God will show us mercy and we can get on the right track.oh by the way I don’t believe in political correctness. It’s a form of censorship. Well there is more but I reckon I have ranted long enough. Y’all take and have a Happy Thanksgiving. God Bless America. Semper Fi

    • msueh

      I thought the same about not being able to leave. That being said, I THOUGHT I deleted my very-short-term account years ago, but following a link provided above:

      (Myke Rosenthal-English ->DMG • 10 months ago
      Log in to your facebook account and use this link,then press DELETE ACCOUNT https://www.facebook.com/help/… )

      I discovered they HADN’T deleted my account, and am therefore trying again. I’ll check back in a few weeks to see if they did. I haven’t been there for years.
      Thanks for spelling “y’all” correctly! 😀

      Yes, God Bless America – and take pity/have mercy on us.
      ~USAF brat

  • inspokane

    I think it is a way to profile the public and put into categories the people that use it. I think it is an ingenuous way to data mine and eventually it will be used against us. Its just the way things work nowadays. They say, no it will never happen. I say Yea! Right!

  • Gregory724

    I quit facebook months ago, and glad I did. Too many aggressive and /or juvenile comments, and TOO MANY ADS! Now we find out Zuckerberg rakes in billions and attacks conservative values. No thanks, bud. Don’t need your liberal gossip site.

  • Blobee

    Isn’t an ancient Chinese curse, “May you get everything you want.”?

  • jrj90620

    I need to stay just to “like” some company,to get some freebies.Otherwise,never go there.

  • Jackie r

    Never was on Facebook & never will be

  • Michael Cornish

    Great article. My profession of teaching (in Australia) was also morphing into something unpleasant. Unrealistic demands, parents, politically driven agendas, unbearable workload etc. I jumped ship and am now working in an asian country where you can still have fun while you work. When secularism takes over things don’t work out.

  • Federico123

    This also happen in many big companies, like Apple, Microsoft, etc. The culture generated is quite similar. There is no dignity for an human who is treated like a number or a machine of course the arrogance is their behavior.
    Good point which put the finger in all those big companies and their aptitudes.

  • starliteblonde

    I have NEVER been on Facebook, I’m not on Twitter or Instagram. I’m so proud of that. It’s all the devils network.

  • Louis Boo

    My mom always told me when raising children, they need rules and structure to thrive. Same with the workplace.

  • Bingolady

    One must be judicious in the use of FB. So much of it is curiosity driven but encompasses many other reasons. I confine my comments to positive and vetted information. Unfortunately, too many see it as a place to spew vicious negativity. Don’t let such a thing get to you.

  • DeplorableMrRightWingDave

    I would “like” this article, but I don’t have a Facebook account.

  • Norma Ann

    interesting info

  • Sus

    I agree with EVERYTHING that I’ve been reading that Return to Order has published. And I’m SO GLAD that Return to Order is doing what it is doing: so many good things. Too many people aren’t seeing it and really should be; however, this is the only article I don’t agree with. In a capitalistic environment, the thoughts are: let companies do what they believe will be successful (within reason, of course with legal, and moral standards) but other than that – if what they do is REALLY, bad and wrong – the market will determine the success of the company. In other words the company will go out of business eventually if it really “should” I agree with the points made in the article about maybe this work environment is too strenuous for some, but heck, there are TONS of trades, jobs, careers and companies that are too hard for people to handle and so that just means that certain people are cut out for certain jobs and some aren’t. The military, nursing, etc. are an examples. I plan on keeping my Facebook account. I don’t ‘follow’ and ‘friend’ many individuals on FB. I use it more as a personalized news outlet. I get so much good information from it – including finding out about Return to Order.

  • Faustina11

    Disconnect from Facebook and cable while you’re at it

  • Timothy Sullivan

    So, referring to the disgruntled employees, you are “In” Facebook, but not a friend?

  • Edwin

    I HATE FACEBOOK! I only use FB to give bad words to the muslim pests and the Banks and expose the New world order nonsense . I can live without FB….

  • Edwin

    I just deleted my hopeless FACEBOOK good for nothing account . I can live without it

  • John Roesch

    Facebook is a good example of bad governance and management. If it continues to operate in this manner it will eventually decline and go bankrupt. It like Google is just a big advertising company. Companies based on Information Technology come and go like mushrooms in the forest. Their corporate lifespan is much shorter than companies that actually make things or provide services with real benefits to people.

  • Brownonion

    I have no account.

  • Bob

    Beware of FB folks. It is a govornment surveillance program. Big brother wants to know your every move, likes dislikes, friends , family, location, interest, contacts etc. If Hitler had had face book just think of how many more would have been murdered. Steer clear of FB and big brothers one world govornment.